John Wallace Custom Guitars Introduces The Aventine Standard

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This high-performing custom electric guitar proves that “simple” doesn’t have to mean “subdued.”

With the introduction of the Aventine Standard, John Wallace Custom Guitars has enabled its workhorse beauty to transform into a tonal beast when the mood strikes. With Sheptone pickups onboard, the Aventine Standard can go from a warm, balanced tones to soaring sustain with ease. From top to bottom, the Aventine Standard gives discerning players plenty to love.

Like its predecessors, construction of the Aventine Standard begins with careful selection of tone woods and the use of time-honored methods. The flamed maple top is hand-carved, not machined, to compliment the contoured mahogany body with full-access cutaways. The front and back are finished in a variety of eye-catching burst finishes, and the woods are united with vintage cream ABS binding. On the back, a thick electronics cavity cover is matched to the body wood, attached via machined screws and set below the surface. This unique feature allows for the tapered contours on the backside of the body to seamlessly carry around the entire lower perimeter of the guitar and through the electronics cavity cover area.

The Aventine can be ordered as set-neck or a bolt on neck. The bolt on version uses threaded metal inserts and machine screws secure the neck to the body, not only preventing the screws from stripping but making for an exceptional connection that improves the resonance of the instrument. The Aventine Standard has a 25’’ scale mahogany neck with a medium-C profile and 12’’ radius that feels comfortable and works well for all playing styles. The rosewood fretboard with pearl dot inlays has 22 medium nickel/silver frets, and the bone nut offers 1 11/16″ (43 mm) width. John has chosen Hipshot tuners as standard equipment on all models for their light weight and smooth and accurate tuning. On the headstock of this model, players will find open back chrome tuners with an 18:1 gear ratio. The strings are attached to the Schaller Signum wrap-tail bridge, which offers precise intonation and locking posts for excellent tone. Standard strap buttons are included.

To capture true vintage spirit, but also to push the Aventine Standard to new limits, John chose the Red Headed Stepchild humbucker set from Sheptone, which delivers over-the-top tone that’s just outside the “Patent Applied For” range. The Red Headed Stepchild is not designed to blend in—it demands to be heard, driving the amp with thick, chunky tones and plenty of crunch. This bridge pickup is paired with its level-headed sibling in the neck, delivering a nice blossoming tone all around.

Players have plenty of options to dial in their ideal tone, with master volume, master tone, and a 3-way toggle. There’s also an optional push-pull coil split on the tone control and optional treble bleed on volume. Under the hood, John fully shields the electronic cavities to reduce unwanted noise and reject stray radio frequency interference.

Even a guitar that’s built to be a workhorse should occasionally be allowed to run free, and the Aventine Standard offers plenty of features that leave the gate open. This guitar has fewer frills than some custom-made models, but the best of the essentials. Players can have it all at an affordable price range of $2.700-$2.900, plus tax and shipping. A standard case is included with purchase.

For a closer look at the Aventine Standard and other John Wallace Custom Guitars, visit www.johnwallaceguitars.com.

About John Wallace Custom Guitars

John Wallace Guitars opened its doors in 2010 in San Diego. Founder John Wallace produces a limited number of Standard hand-crafted guitars per year with no two guitars exactly the same. His approach is straightforward: function trumps fashion and should be paramount in construction. These are guitars built to inspire the player—the kind of guitar he’d want to play himself.

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